Have a lot of nervous energy? Here’s 6 steps to get your peace back!

I’ll never forget the time I had read about ADD…

This is going back several years, and I already began the process of deconstructing the original stories that I was told when I was a kid.

Put simply, I was told a few things when I was very young, only half were remotely true.

So you can imagine my surprise that, when I began delving deeper into my mental issues, I came across ADD and began recognising a lot of the symptoms.

Just over 9 yeas ago, I moved out and into a whole new world of living on my own and the internet. Interestingly, my journey of self-discovery also began there.

The Journey had begun!

When I wasn’t gaming or watching porn (I am a former porn addict…I know, but I’m being honest here), I would read countless articles online.

I would also read many stories on people similar to myself, who had been almost duped by some of their peers.

Put it this way, I as told when I was younger that I had Aspergers syndrome, a particular type of autism. It turned out after studying my condition, that it was more similar to the symptoms of ADD (albeit a mild form) with symptom of mercury poisoning splashed in for good measure (thanks, Thimerosal!).

This is where it gets interesting…

All of this meant that my head was always in the clouds and that I couldn’t concentrate very easily.

Not necessarily a big deal in college (although you won’t be passing that many exams), but when you go to work and you get stressed, its a whole different ball game.

You see, when you are day-dreaming, you are essentially in the alpha state, which is the state to be in for hypnosis.

To sum this up, you essentially hypnotise yourself during stressful conditions, meaning that you take on a lot of bad beliefs without even realising it.

And don’t forget, your beliefs dictate you behaviours, so you are essentially in a funny, sick system, where you can buy all the self-improvement stuff that you want, (and even understand it all) but unable to implement barely 10% of it!

And that’s not fair

To my cost, I only truly realised this nearly 10 years later, and can now recognise the point when my mind feels slushy, and I know I’m heading for a hypnotic state.

I can pretty much snap out of this alpha state, although it sometimes takes a bit of effort.

And it isn’t always when I am sitting at a desk that I can slip into the alpha state, but can be when I am sometimes out and about, talking to people (this seems to happen quite a lot when I am talking to psychologically strong minded people…it’s as if their strong minds somehow renders my weak one useless…).

The thing is, ADD affects around 4% off the population for the US alone, and looks set to increase.

It can be really difficult to do tasks, especially if you are very sensitive as there is a lot of mental chaos in you brain. Even doing something that you partially enjoy can seem like a chore.

Boredom isn’t too far away!

And I can vouch for this.

For years, I have been in an office, where intense boredom mixed with intense stress taunted my mind for over 10 years.

When I finally moved department, it was like a big thick fog had lifted. I still had some thick mist mind you (thanks to insomnia) but it wasn’t nearly so bad.

So, what was the hack that I discovered, that not only helps you emotionally calm down and re-focus but is also a great way of calming the inner chatter in your mind, so that you can mindfully meditate a lot more easily.

Quite simply, all I do is tap.

That’s it.

This isn’t EFT in case you are wondering (well the last part is, but not the main steps).

I suspected that all of my fantasying came from one thing… an over-stimulated right-hemisphered brain.

I kinda realised that if I was getting a lot of nervous energy (I have always figited, and couldn’t sit still), I realised that I had a lot of energy inside me that I couldn’t use.

I also understood that I had to simply, ‘logicalise’ this energy, to calm my inner mind down and bring the balance of energy in my brain back.

This helped me get back my mind back to focus and peace.

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Or to put it another way, I was able to reduce the amount of imagery in my mind, by consciously moving my body, instead of subconsciously moving my body (and don’t forget, nervous energy is also an indication of an over-stimulated sympathetic nervous system).

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So what you do is this:

1– Notice the next time you are fantasying or are using a lot of nervous energy.

2– You may also notice the hidden anxiety (there will be some) and realise that your breathing is probably shallow.

3– When you notice that you are using nervous energy, you are unable to sit still, figiting around, daydreaming etc, start consciously tapping.

4– This can be done anywhere, on your body, at your desk…anywhere where you can tap without making a loud noise (best not to disturb people;-).

5– You will find that within 2 minutes, you will become more calm, more mindful, your breathing will be coming from you belly (not always, but sometimes) and you may even find that some Oxytocin will be released (feeling warm around your heart).

6– As a bonus second tip, you can use the EFT quick version, which is to try tapping your wrist with 2 fingers, as this can help the meridians disperse the nervous energy.

Tapping when you get nervous is an excellent simple and free way to reduce the brain chaos and to help steer the ship around, so to speak.

By doing this when you get nervous, you will reduce your anxiety so you can feel more at peace and be more productive with your goals, so you can lead a more happier and abundant lifestyle.

You can also combine this with your meditation practice.

Find a place to sit or lie down, and tap your fingers consciously to help reduce your inner mind imagery if you have difficulty in calming your mind down.

You will find that by doing this for a short while will allow you to achieve mindfulness that little bit more quicker, and you will be able to achieve peace more easier and effortlessly than ever before.

If you do want to find an equally easier way to meditate deeper, you can try the ARVARI courses by Gerald O’Donnell. They are a CD course which, when listened to, allow you to enter very deep states of meditation from Alpha to Delta.

If you wish to find out more details and to read my review, click here.

Till next time

Julian.

P.S. Day-dreaming most of the time can mean that you may have a symptom of ADD, especially if you have a lot of nervous energy, or that you cannot sit still. This can be disruptive in school or work, and can cause issues with your mental health and your family.

Tapping consciously can be a great way to bring mental clarity back and can help you remain calm in nervous situations. By tapping your fingers, you can help calm yourself down emotionally, bringing peace, being able to re-focus as well as making mindfulness more easier for you.

Practising meditation is another great way to help keep you focused. If you want to find out how to achieve very deep states of meditation and to find out more details on the ARVARI course, please click here.

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The Vagus Nerve as your secret weapon, and 6 steps to activate it!

I love your Vagus nerve.

It is one of the most powerful nerves in your body, yet least talked about.

And I’m not quite sure why…

Here’s the thing.

There is a good chance that you have never heard of your vagus nerve, or that you have heard of it, but have little or no knowledge about it.

There is another good chance that if you are visiting my blog, you probably have some anxiety issue of some description, and you are looking for a decent relief from it.

What if I were to tell you that your vagus nerve is the epicentre of all of your healing stories?

Or to put it another way; if you wish to begin your self-healing (and note the word begin) it all starts with your vagus nerve!

Have I lost you yet?

Good.

So, let me quickly explain what the heck the vagus nerve is all about and how, by using a simple 6 part process, can bring about quick mental peace.

Because this crap is about to get real, real quick!

What exactly is it?

As the name suggests, your vagus nerve is the only nerve to stem from your brain and touch every main organ in your body, and is your interface between your parasympathetic nervous system (feelings of calm) and sympathetic nervous system (flight-or-fight mode).

The general idea (but just to warn you, this idea is still being investigated scientifically) is that most mental illness, including some autism, is due to an over-stimulated sympathetic system (but that article is for another day).

To counter the effect of an over-stimulated sympathetic nervous system and to bring peace to the mental chaos in the human mind, one needs to find a way to activate the parasympathetic nervous system.

This counters the fight-and-flight response, which helps ageing!

Whilst you can’t do this directly (sorry to burst any bubbles…) you can do it directly by activating your vagus nerve…

I say directly, because in truth you will be also be activating your vagus nerve indirectly by using your breathing in a certain special way.

Stay with me here, because I’m about to show you a technique which I use personally to help activate your vagus nerve.

This also stimulates more growth hormone!

Human growth hormone does the following:

– It helps regulate muscle and bone growth, including healing fractures

– Helps increase your sex drive

– Helps with weight loss

– Helps slow the progression of illnesses that are age related

– Reduces the risk of cardio vascular disease

– Can even reduce hair loss

– And don’t forget better sleep!

Has that wet your appetite.

Thought so!

Here goes…

Now the trick to activating your vagus nerve is to breath in a certain way.

Don’t forget, your parasympathetic nervous system kicks in normally while your sleep anyway, while the sympathetic nervous system remains stable during the REM part of sleep (the REM bit, where your brainwaves are in Theta/alpha and you dream, but your body is paralysed so you don’t act out your deams).

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The type of breathing is usually variable during REM sleep, but is usually stable during deep NREM sleep.

You have to essentially pretend that you are on the verge of snoring when you are breathing, to help activate the vagus nerve.

It is no coincidence that when the tongue is flat on the floor of your mouth, this is the ideal tongue posture for singing. Singing, incidently, is another good way of activating it.

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Here goes:

1. Let your tongue rest on the bottom of your mouth. If done correctly, you should feel the back of your tongue touching the back of your teeth.

2. Using belly breathing, breath through your nose and pretend your on the verge of snoring. If you do find that you are snoring, you’re slightly over doing it.

3. You may find a slight contraction of the windpipe (i.e. it will feel like your tongue is partially in the way) so make sure you can still breath normally and that you are not stopping yourself breathing.

4. This does take a bit of practice to find this balance. You are looking for that middle ground of the back of your tongue resting on the floor of your mouth, but not too much that you are obstructing your own breathing channels.

5. Keep practising and you will find that, when done properly, a warm feeling will begin to flood your heart area (your heart chakra will be opening) and you may find that your 3rd eye may be activated.

Or to put simply, if you feel a loving, warm feeling encompass your heart, that is oxytocin being released, meaning that you are activating your vagus nerve.

6. Keep practising this until you can do this without much effort, and you will find that you will have trained yourself to use a tool that can counter some of the damaging health effects of stress from someone who is in fight-or-flight mode, but who isn’t consciously aware of this.

The beauty of using this technique, is that once you feel stress coming on you can quickly help activate your vagus nerve which will calm you down and help ward of the damaging effects of an overstimulated sympathetic nervous system response.

This can also include accelerated ageing due to the effect oxidative stress has on your Telomeres (part of your DNA…again, this will be explained in a later article;-).

When you practise this form of deep belly breathing, you will help almost manually begin the healing process, as the stimulation of the vagus nerve helps with improving memory, as well as increasing your immunity.

Stimulating your vagus nerve for stress relief is a great way of reducing stress/anxiety and depression

However, there is also an equally easier way of reducing stress and help you focus on your goals, so you can lead a more healthier, happier and productive lifestyle.

You can do this with learning and applying NLP, which also allows you to help keep your body from being overstimulated and can also help you with your goals and aspirations.

If you wish to learn more about NLP, and to learn great techniques that also involve understanding your very owns body subconscious (which is responsible for 99.9% of your behaviour), please click here to read my review on the NLP practitioners training course, by NLP trainer Michael Stevenson.

By using NLP with your vagus nerve will not only help you reduce stress and help be mentally focused, you will also be motivated so you can really go for your goals, and begin creating the life that you really want.

To find out more about the NLP practitioners Training course, please click here.

Till next time.

Julian.

P.S. Using your vagus nerve with deep breathing is a great way to reduce stress and even activate the parasympathetic nervous system, which is is the same system that stimulates growth hormone that helps with growth and healing in many parts of your body.

Whilst you cannot stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system directly, you can do it indirectly, by pretending to almost snore while belly breathing.

Due to the tongue being flat against your mouth, this will cause the vagus nerve to be stimulated, bringing the required emotional change.

Using anchoring with the activation of your vagus nerve is another great way of not only reducing stress, but also to focus on your goals. Anchoring can be achieved using NLP.

If you would like to find out more information on NLP, please look into the NLP practitioners course, by clicking here.

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Depression and 2 unusual ways to reduce it’s effects!

I consider myself to be very highly sensitive…

I’ve been sensitive growing up through high school and found myself getting hurt emotionally on a fairly regular basis. Then, going through college, It developed into OCD (when you repeat certain behaviours in an attempt to feel safe and secure). Being told I was autistic (although I would later challenge this believing it was ADD and mercury poisoning later on) didn’t help matters, especially when one is told that you had a problem that you had to deal with for all of your life, and often told in a very patronising way by people who you trusted the most (yeah, juck out self-healing why don’t you…).

Being made to feel ashamed, especially when you are a highly sensitive person, does no help for your self-esteem and self-confidence, and I soon began to loose control of my emotional state to the point that, when I began work in the early 2000’s, I got slowly depressed. I suffered from depression for a good 5-7 years.

Over 350 million people suffer from depression. So what can be done about it, as depression is not only hurting your body (please watch this video for more info), but also looses your focus so you are unable to be productive at work and at home?

I recently began getting depressed, and then had a very intuitive moment. Below are 2 exercises that I did, that not only help me identify the issue, but also stopped the depression dead in it’s tracks. I hope they do the same for you!

These exercises are best done quickly, (I found) as your subconscious likes speed. So please take no more than about a minute doing them.

Exercise 1

Find something in the past or the future imagined scenario that will cause you to become depressed, that is, something that you think will cause you to be depressed seemingly forever or for the moderate term. Something that you think that if you had it, there would be no way you can come to terms with it, and it will haunt you to the end of days. Try to really look at depression, to see it in the eye. Try to imagine holding it…what does it look like? Does it have a smell? What size is it, etc.

When you have done that quick exercise, try the next one.

Exercise 2

Try to become present, that is, nearly mindful. For the purpose of this exercise, you won’t be completely present due to the amount of thinking being used, but try to be nearly mindful. Try to get closed to being present as much of possible, whilst still remaining close to some form of logically thinking capability.

Now, look around and in yourself, and try to spot depression in yourself or outside of you. Again, whilst trying to be close to being present, try to spot and look depression in the eye, try to find it, try to really locate the source of the depression, that you think will be with you until the end of days.

What colour is it? What size? What shape? Does it even have a smell?

What you will notice in both cases (providing your condition isn’t too chronic) is that, while you may have noticed depressing moments in the first exercise, because you were using your conscious logical left-hemisphered part of your brain, any negative moments you did stumble upon quickly had solutions thrusted upon them, or you moved onto a new image or feeling. Whilst you may have had moments that you felt depression, it was very short term, and not as long-term as you thought it would be.

That is because you had your logical, ‘guard’ up. You have a logical conscious for a reason, and one of the main reasons is for calculation and for problem solving. Depression in some cases takes place when this guard is, ‘down’. That is, you are in the subconscious, ‘receiving’ state, getting all sorts of negative imagery lobbed into your direction without any obvious protection.

Sounds too deep? Let me give you an example.

I worked in a desk job, answering some emails for customers. The problem was, due to being highly sensitive as I am, when I was consciously at work (i.e. actually typing a response to a query) my ‘guard’ would be brought down, allowing my sensitive sub-conscious to pick up energies, which it then converted into images and emotions (depending on what type of person you are, you may hear audio or may have different feelings).

I was in the passive, ‘receiving’ state, meaning that, while as was using my conscious to do work, due to not being fully involved with the task at hand, I was getting lots of conversions of energy being translated into imagery being thrown into my conscious mind almost against my will. Or, to put it in simple street language, I would unwittingly fantasise and imagine all sorts of depressing and negative scenarios which would ultimately bring my mood down.

Depression in some cases can take place when the subconscious that picks up other negative sources of energy and converts it, isn’t being logically challenged. That is, the imagery (or audio, random bad emotion etc) isn’t being processed by the logical, critical left-hemisphere of your brain. Essentially, you have become, ‘ungrounded’.

One of the greatest ways to free yourself from the grip of depression, is to notice the specifics of it and name it out loud; that is, give it the verbal treatment. This allows the two hemispheres to become more balanced, allowing you to become more mindful. Or to put it another way, challenging the depressing imagery allows your critical, ‘guard’ to go back up.

Alternately, you can try to do what they describe in NLP as pattern interrupting. Quite simply, think of the depressing moment, and then, quite randomly and spontaneously, look at something behind you on the wall and really take it all in. Could be a photo you have, could be the TV etc… this, again, allows your critical conscious, ‘guard’ to go back up, and you will find it slightly more difficult in thinking of the depressed imagery and may even become slightly mindful in the process.

 

Feeling Under The Weather? Think Again!

Credit: Youtube / Dr. Joe Marshalla

Coming across a video like this makes you realize how important your feelings, as well as how important monitoring your emotions are to your health.

I first came across this video a couple of years ago. I had just heard about Dr. Joe Marshalla, but didn’t know too much about him, or Repeatlessness. I had watched some of his Mind control videos, thinking (stupidly) that it may be on how people used mind control techniques on you (maybe I was going a bit into too much conspiracy theory mindset here, I wasn’t sure…).

This video is a clip from one of the mind control videos, and beautifully shows how the effects of emotions and feelings, specifically love and fear, has an effect on your overall physical strength.

What it simply shows, is how you emotions has a direct control over how strong, or how weak you will be. And of course, you emotions also help govern your immune system, so if you are going to be really negative, your immune system will suffer. If on the other hand you are going to feel and give as much love and compassion out, your immune system will be boosted (I once had the luxury of feeling compassion at work once, whilst sneezing and having a cold, and my cold symptoms temporarily alleviated).

It goes without saying that your emotions affect your behaviour, so by controlling or redirecting your emotional state, you behaviour will change in certain ways where you can become more productive at work, at home and start to make changes in your life.

These days, I try to exude as much love as I can. I’m not saying this is easy, as most of us have had stressful and hectic moments in our lives. Trying to exude love in the workplace can feel like trying to achieve the impossible to some of us, so we have to be careful not to be too emotional if we can help it.

But if we can, somehow, control our emotional state (which usually involves a change in perception), we can make small but significant changes in our lives. And as they always say, every little thing counts;-)

Watch the video and see for yourself. I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

 

Mindfulness While Doing Your Job: My Experiment-Part 2

Last week, I decided to do an experiment.

I wanted to find out if by practicing focusing on my breath, could I still maintain a mindfulness, ‘presence’ while doing my job. I figured that, out of all the techniques out there, half-focusing on my breath and half-thinking about the task at hand would be the best balance at being mindful while being at the workplace.

I wanted to give it just 7 days to see how it planned out.

Well, needless to say, I’ve learned a lot in those 7 days…I’ve learned more about how my mind worked, and I’ve also learned a lot about breathing while trying to focus on doing the task at hand.

I was able to stay somewhat present, although in the end I had to use a different technique altogether to achieve this.

The first thing I noticed was that I had to actually remember to be present to begin with. While this may not sound much, our EGO-based culture has ensured that mindfulness is more of a novelty than a minimum required way of living.

As such, I had to constantly remind my-self that I had to be, ‘present’ for this week due to this experiment.

This wasn’t easy.

As noted in my first article, I do tend to fantasize a lot, so actually remembering to be, ‘present’, when my imagination had far more fun and important things to think about was initially very difficult.

However, with reminders, I found myself actually enjoying the moment of remembering and being, ‘present’. Of course, that meant that I had to spend less time in my fantasy world, and more time here in physicality…which meant that I had to actually solve current problems that I was facing.

The weird thing was, while I was fantasying, my problems were automatically amplified. When I was, ‘present’, most of them seemed to just work themselves out. Food for thought;-)

Secondly, I had to actually implement a new technique to being mindful while doing tasks.

I couldn’t keep focusing on my breath and concentrating at the task at hand. I had to use more mental processing power than I originally thought.

True, focusing on your breath while thinking is doable, but the mental power is actually very small. Or to put it another way, if it is a very mundane task, like cleaning your house, focusing on your breath would probably keep you relatively, ‘present’.

However, for more complicated tasks, where more mental thought was needed for more complex problem solving, focusing on your breath just wasn’t going to work.

I needed a new technique to help me in being, ‘present’, yet being able to focus using more thoughts.

I came across a great blog, by Morty Lefkoe. He talks about how events do not have any  ingrained meaning, but only the meaning that you give it. Basically, everything you see in life, including your own life experiences, are just outcomes. If you want to attach meaning to them, that’s up to you.

When I began seeing everything in my life as just outcomes, my EGO seemed to just stop.

I was also able to properly focus at the task at hand, and as I was nearly, ‘present’ (in some cases, quite, ‘present’) I felt more inner peace.

In the end, I began seeing life as nothing more than outcomes to natural consciousness manifestations.

That is, whatever my consciousness, either conscious, sub-conscious, or super-conscious manifested, that would be the outcome I would experience.

If I wanted to label it, I could do. But that was my choice…it was ultimately nothing more but an outcome (similar to a mathematical equation, just giving out an answer…it’s up to you to give the answer a meaning).

I’m not trying to de-value life, merely trying to keep the EGO in it’s place.

As this is a blog about anxiety, you could say that the real question could be this: from a fear point of view, could this actually help you overcome any anxiety disorder?

I would answer that if remembered and practiced daily, I can’t see how this couldn’t dramatically help you reduce the effects, but I cannot say for sure.

Quite simply, there were some parts of my anxiety disorder still remaining (I do suffer from OCD, especially at night).

I found that your Amygdala is still very strong, going to bed. But I cannot see, providing you go to bed on time, why not?

Overall, I learn’t that I fantasized more than I realized, and that I have probably created neurons in my mind to make fantasying very easy. However, any scientist could tell you that with practice, new habits can be formed, which means new neurons would be wired in your brain.

With more practice, comes new behavior.

And with new behaviors comes a new way of life.

I will certainly see more of life as outcomes based, which should help dramatically reduce the fear that I sometimes experience at night, and therefore create new beliefs. I invite you to do the same;-)

 

The 4 biggest mistakes that panic attack sufferers face, and how you can avoid them

Thousands of people suffer from panic attacks, due to pressures from family and work-life every month. The problem with this, is that only some sufferers seek the treatment that they need to recover from a potentially life-changing experience. As a result, many carry on through life, never really fulfilling living their lifes purpose and leading a miserable life.

Having suffered from panic attacks myself, I understand the true gravity of the situation. They are not easy to live with, and can be very detrimental to the living of your life. Below, I have listed 4 main reasons which I believe are the cause as to why some people never fully recover.

1. They don’t know what a panic attack is

To recover from a panic attack, you need to fully recognize the symptoms. They include Dizziness, a feeling of terror, light-headiness, a racing heart, and de-personalisation (a feeling of being detached from your body) amongst others. Once you recognize these symptoms, you are better prepared to recognize the panic attack and learning to cope with it.

Think of it like driving a car. For you to drive successfully, you need to understand all of the tools in front of you (like the steering wheel, gears, brake pedal, etc.). Only then can you learn how to use them to your advantage.

2. They don’t take it seriously enough

It does sound harsh, but some people actually don’t take panic attacks seriously enough. To some, feeling dizzy, having a racing heart, and thinking you’re going to pass out is just one experience that they think will never happen again. They don’t realize that if untreated, panic attacks can flair up anywhere, at anytime.

Going back to the driving analogy, you wouldn’t put a half-assed attempt into learning to drive a car (you’ll be wasting both your money and your time!). You would make sure that you learn everything you need to learn, so that when you are on the road, you are not only comfortable, but also a safe driver.

That is why you need to take it seriously enough to get help immediately! If you don’t fully diagnose the problem, you could end up creating coping strategies to avoid certain things in your life, like traveling down a particular route to get to work, or avoiding supermarkets in general. All because you’re scared of having a panic attack.

3. They don’t have a, ‘system’ to follow

In order for you to recover from panic attacks, you need to have a proper system to follow. The problem with panic attacks, is that while the symptoms will never change, everybody is different and one treatment for one sufferer may not have the same effect on another sufferer.

For example, being mindful (the ability to be, ‘present’) is actually a very good way to coping and reducing a panic attack. However, some people find that being mindful is a mind-fall job (forgive the bad pun;-). To some, learning to be, ‘present’ is tough enough to begin with, not alone learning to do it when your mind is racing with terrifying thoughts.

Going back to driving the car, you wouldn’t just turn the key and expect to drive away, would you? You would need to check your mirrors, make sure you are in the correct gear, before driving off.

That is where learning different strategies comes into play. In the above case, using a distraction method would be best suited to the sufferer concerned, as they would have a hard time in being, ‘present’.

4. They don’t set a realistic time for recovery

Look, I know we are in a society that expects everything now, and while recovering from a panic attack is a simple process, it does take time.

You wouldn’t hop into a car just after the first few lessons, and expect to pass your test and be road worthy, would you? Same with recovering from a panic attack. It takes time to actually master the simple techniques, so that when the going does get tough you can quickly employ them and recover in as shortish time as possible.

That is why I like Wale Oladipo’s eBook, ‘The Essential Guide To Anxiety Panic Recovery‘. He doesn’t pull any punches when it comes to describing what anxiety is, and how it can increase over time. Not only that, but he comes out with a pretty good analogy himself, describing your subconscious as a reservoir, which overflows (anxiety condition) when it gets full (negative emotion).

I really liked his analogy, because in my opinion it describes anxiety at it best. You have to be really wary of any negative thoughts and feelings that you entertain and the more techniques you learn to cope with panic attacks, the easier it is to recover from them.

If you do want to follow a good system, I do personally recommend Wale Oladipo’s, ‘The Essential Guide To Anxiety Panic Recovery‘. It’s a short eBook (under 60 pages) which gives you good practical tips on recovering from not only panic attacks, but also loneliness and defeating negative thinking (which are crucial in recovering from long-term panic.).

When I read his eBook, I began to understand how important mindfulness really was, and now I implement it as much as possible. By doing this, I am also re-wiring my subconscious, so I can think slight differently in situations that can cause me stress, which could ultimately lead onto a panic attack.

Click here to more information.

 

Mindfulness While Doing Your Job: My Experiment

Everybody knows the benefits of mindfulness meditation.

From improved concentration, to even the ability to age slowly to restoration of peace of mind. And we can take this into the workplace, so we can be more productive with our tasks and be more happier in what we are doing.

What I’m saying is that being mindful has numerous benefits and if you can take this into the workplace, a place when you can get stressed very easily, your chances of panic attack recovery increases dramatically.

Even in a workplace where you find the workload dull and boring, mindfulness can be a great way in keeping yourself from being distracted, and therefore stopping mistakes by distraction from creeping in.

By stopping yourself from being distracted, you are consistently producing a higher quality of work, which should keep you in favor of your job and should, thanks to the decreased effects of the Amygdala, keep you as stress free as possible.

You see, I was going to write an article about mindfulness while actually doing your job. But then I decided against it for numerous reasons.

The Dilemma

When you are mindful, you are essentially in the, ‘hear and now’.

That’s fine, and we all need it to keep our stress levels at bay, stop panic attacks from flaring up, and ultimately have good peace of mind. The problem is in trying to be mindful enough to being present, yet still, ‘think’ as part of our job.

This was the dilemma I faced fairly recently. Being mindful while being at the work place… how can you be mindful, yet think in order to do your job?

Do you try to be present in between the small jobs you are doing, i.e. every small minute you have of free time?

This could seem slightly arduous, that only a very strong disciplined mind can achieve. We need to find something a bit more practical and more realistic to obtain; something that you can get into a habit of…that is to say, practicing it until you can do it without giving it a thought.

So instead of writing about mindfulness in the workplace, I’m going to do a 7 day experiment.

Starting from today, I’m going to incorporate a certain technique into my day-to-day running of things, and see how it will affect my way of thinking, my general focus, and ultimately my beliefs (I’m thinking that if I’m, ‘present’ as much as possible, surely this may indirectly affect what I believe in).

The Technique

In order for me to pull this off, I’m going to have to employ a famous mindfulness technique which is one that can be done using the tiniest of thinking power: Breathing.

I’m going to focus on my breathing, while trying to think about the task I am trying to achieve.

I have already done an earlier test on this, and found the results quite surprising; I found that although I could still think, I couldn’t daydream as easily as I could (I used to be a heavy fantasizer in days gone by).

And while my thoughts were quite clear, I found that I felt more at peace than when I was thinking fully.

The Drawback

Of course with any experiment, there will be some problems.

The first one I anticipate is the fantasying. I am big into day dreaming. I know it isn’t productive (i.e. it doesn’t help with achieving your goals, unless you focus that daydreaming into visualization) but I do fantasize quite a bit while doing my chores. So I don’t expect myself to be focused on my breath as much as I would like to.

Also, this is also sleep dependent. Having insomnia means that unless you have a great nights sleep, experiments like these are usually meaningless.

That is, unless you feel generally refreshed to begin with, people with attentional problems (like myself) find it hard to concentrate alone, not alone be mindful.

I’m hoping that if I can keep being focused on my breath slightly, my thoughts (although slow) will be more focused so I can still achieve my goals in the quickest time possible, while retaining the internal willpower and inner peace of mind that we expect mindfulness to achieve.

Keep in tune for the results next week;-)

 

Panic attacks in the workplace and 6 ways to cope with it

I’ll never forget the time when I had panic attacks in work.

It wasn’t sudden, but a build up of over a few years. One minute I would be fine talking to customers on the phone, the next minute I would be getting very hot under the collar, very clammy, and really panicky at saying the wrong word that could trigger a customer to start getting irate.

I hated it.

It’s funny that you can look back at these things years ago and sort off smile…but back then, it wasn’t funny. It was deadly serious. But I didn’t know what it was.

I sort of knew about panic attacks and extreme stress, but I had no idea of what a burnout was. I was in my mid twenties for crying out loud. Life wasn’t meant to be like this. But it was, especially for me. This was my life, and I was supposed to just accept it, not complain about it, deal with it and move on!

So that was it…for a period of about 2 1/2 years, I was constantly clammy, constantly rubbing my hands, constantly sipping water to trying to comfort myself; wandering whether the next customer was going to be nice or mean and wandering why I was panicky, feeling light headed and felt like I was going to pass out. I had know idea that I was able to use little techniques to eliminate a panic, and I certainly had no idea that I could use mindfulness to overcome those feelings of dread. For me, panic attacks at work was a way of life.

I even tried some Bach’s flower remedies to try to relax myself, but even that didn’t always work (although sometimes it did). I will say, looking back at it now, that I made the situation 10 times harder than it needed to be.

I should’ve gotten my sleep, yet at the time, 5 1/2 hours was luxury

I should’ve used mindfulness meditation, but at the time, I was more into Qi meditation than mindfulness…not a bad meditation to be fair, but it’s not going to do much to reduce the effects of an over-stimulated Amygdala.

Panic attacks and anxiety in the workplace is responsible for over $37 billion of the mental health bill, which pretty much means (that at the risk of sounding harsh), if you are not able to cope with and eventually eliminate your condition, not only is it sucking the life and soul out of you, it is also part of the problem that is costing billions.

Yet most of us understand the symptoms of excessive anxiety in the workplace: they range from being unable to focus, to sleep deprivation (including insomnia), from panic attacks to worrying excessively to the point of paranoia, plus much more.

So how do we improve our coping skills so we don’t feel our soul being sucked away from our life, and are therefore able to at least enjoy the aspects of the job that we find simple to do?

1 – Practice mindfulness throughout the day

Doing this alone will help reduce your anxiety in a very short space of time and will reduce the onset of a panic attack. Just taking a few minutes when the going gets tough is all that is required to restore a mental clarity and resume focus, so your main work doesn’t suffer.

You can achieve being present in various ways, but one of the easiest I have found is to widen your peripheral vision. This alone will help you reduce the mental chit-chatter and will restore a peaceful mind.

2 – Take exercise during break times

Maybe a short walk or even walking your car, whatever it takes to get you outside. This will help, ‘walk off’ the anxiety and will allow you to slowly relax, and take your mind of the anxiety or panic attack. Practicing mindfulness while doing this is a great way of getting better at being mindful.

3 -Meditate during your lunchtime

If you can do it, meditating in the privacy of your own car during the lunch break is a good way of reducing the anxiety and help reduce the onset of a future panic attack. I used to do a form of Chakra meditation, where I would visualize a spinning colored flower, the color dependent upon the Chakra that I would like to open and balance, but any kind of meditation should work for you, as long as you can get into a relaxed sitting position in your car.

4 – Practice deep breathing

Doing this will help calm yourself down and will also help reduce a current panic attack. It will also give you a clarity of mind that will help reduce the onset of any future intense anxiety.

Just by taking a minute to breath gently but deeply should allow the current anxiety to slowly subside. If you wish, take a deep belly breath via you nose, hold for 4 seconds, and then slowly release through your mouth. Doing this for a minute will help calm your nerves down.

5 – Get your sleep/power-nap

Getting your sleep is vital for reducing future panic attacks, but admittedly it can be a viscous circle. You can be that stressed at work, that getting your required 7-8 hours can be a huge task. If you find that you cannot switch off when going to bed, and end up getting a poor nights sleep, trying looking into supplements to help you relax, or try Bach Flower remedies.

For the immediate short term, trying getting a power-nap during your break times. Just 10-15 minutes of a nap is enough to keep your energy levels up, and will allow you to have some mental focus back.

6 – Open up your Heart Chakra

I put this one last, because of its spiritualistic nature, but what you can do if you feel panic coming on is to see people as extensions of yourself. I know this may sound weird, but it does strangely open up your Heart Chakra, so you can feel a deep compassion swell and fill your heart.

This has a nice soothing effect, and will even help reduce a future panic episode. Using the combination of opening up your Heart Chakra while being present can be a very powerful duo in combating anxiety attacks and restoring peace of mind.

Try the above and let me know how it goes on. Suffering from panic attacks in the workplace, when you’re trying to enjoy life and do work, is not only a terrible thing for a sufferer to go through, it’s also a waste of a precious life. By doing the above exercises, you can be sure that a recovery isn’t too far away.