The 4 biggest mistakes that panic attack sufferers face, and how you can avoid them

Thousands of people suffer from panic attacks, due to pressures from family and work-life every month. The problem with this, is that only some sufferers seek the treatment that they need to recover from a potentially life-changing experience. As a result, many carry on through life, never really fulfilling living their lifes purpose and leading a miserable life.

Having suffered from panic attacks myself, I understand the true gravity of the situation. They are not easy to live with, and can be very detrimental to the living of your life. Below, I have listed 4 main reasons which I believe are the cause as to why some people never fully recover.

1. They don’t know what a panic attack is

To recover from a panic attack, you need to fully recognize the symptoms. They include Dizziness, a feeling of terror, light-headiness, a racing heart, and de-personalisation (a feeling of being detached from your body) amongst others. Once you recognize these symptoms, you are better prepared to recognize the panic attack and learning to cope with it.

Think of it like driving a car. For you to drive successfully, you need to understand all of the tools in front of you (like the steering wheel, gears, brake pedal, etc.). Only then can you learn how to use them to your advantage.

2. They don’t take it seriously enough

It does sound harsh, but some people actually don’t take panic attacks seriously enough. To some, feeling dizzy, having a racing heart, and thinking you’re going to pass out is just one experience that they think will never happen again. They don’t realize that if untreated, panic attacks can flair up anywhere, at anytime.

Going back to the driving analogy, you wouldn’t put a half-assed attempt into learning to drive a car (you’ll be wasting both your money and your time!). You would make sure that you learn everything you need to learn, so that when you are on the road, you are not only comfortable, but also a safe driver.

That is why you need to take it seriously enough to get help immediately! If you don’t fully diagnose the problem, you could end up creating coping strategies to avoid certain things in your life, like traveling down a particular route to get to work, or avoiding supermarkets in general. All because you’re scared of having a panic attack.

3. They don’t have a, ‘system’ to follow

In order for you to recover from panic attacks, you need to have a proper system to follow. The problem with panic attacks, is that while the symptoms will never change, everybody is different and one treatment for one sufferer may not have the same effect on another sufferer.

For example, being mindful (the ability to be, ‘present’) is actually a very good way to coping and reducing a panic attack. However, some people find that being mindful is a mind-fall job (forgive the bad pun;-). To some, learning to be, ‘present’ is tough enough to begin with, not alone learning to do it when your mind is racing with terrifying thoughts.

Going back to driving the car, you wouldn’t just turn the key and expect to drive away, would you? You would need to check your mirrors, make sure you are in the correct gear, before driving off.

That is where learning different strategies comes into play. In the above case, using a distraction method would be best suited to the sufferer concerned, as they would have a hard time in being, ‘present’.

4. They don’t set a realistic time for recovery

Look, I know we are in a society that expects everything now, and while recovering from a panic attack is a simple process, it does take time.

You wouldn’t hop into a car just after the first few lessons, and expect to pass your test and be road worthy, would you? Same with recovering from a panic attack. It takes time to actually master the simple techniques, so that when the going does get tough you can quickly employ them and recover in as shortish time as possible.

That is why I like Wale Oladipo’s eBook, ‘The Essential Guide To Anxiety Panic Recovery‘. He doesn’t pull any punches when it comes to describing what anxiety is, and how it can increase over time. Not only that, but he comes out with a pretty good analogy himself, describing your subconscious as a reservoir, which overflows (anxiety condition) when it gets full (negative emotion).

I really liked his analogy, because in my opinion it describes anxiety at it best. You have to be really wary of any negative thoughts and feelings that you entertain and the more techniques you learn to cope with panic attacks, the easier it is to recover from them.

If you do want to follow a good system, I do personally recommend Wale Oladipo’s, ‘The Essential Guide To Anxiety Panic Recovery‘. It’s a short eBook (under 60 pages) which gives you good practical tips on recovering from not only panic attacks, but also loneliness and defeating negative thinking (which are crucial in recovering from long-term panic.).

When I read his eBook, I began to understand how important mindfulness really was, and now I implement it as much as possible. By doing this, I am also re-wiring my subconscious, so I can think slight differently in situations that can cause me stress, which could ultimately lead onto a panic attack.

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